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Wednesday, 20 April 2011

08 RITCHIE FABULAE FACILES TRANSLATION - PERSEUS 08 - THE RESCUE

PERSEUS 08 - THE RESCUE with notes and interlinear translation


a)At Perseus ubi haec vídit, gladium suum édúxit, et postquam tálária induit, in áera sublátus est. Tum désuper in mónstrum impetum subitó fécit, et gladió suó collum éius graviter vulnerávit. Mónstrum ubi sénsit vulnus, fremitum horribilem édidit, et sine morá tótum corpus in aquam mersit. Perseus dum circum lítus volat, reditum éius exspectábat. Mare autem intereá undique sanguine ínficitur. Post breve tempus bélua rúrsus caput sustulit; mox tamen á Perseó íctú gravióre vulneráta est. Tum iterum sé in undás mersit, neque posteá vísa est.


 
b)  We have picked out some words for consideration below. For the words not included in this list please refer to the WORDLIST in PAGES TOP RIGHT SIDE BAR.

suum, eius - Remember to distinguish carefully between these words. ‘Suus’ is used of something belonging to the subject, ‘eius’ of something belonging to some other person or thing just mentioned. Gladium suum means ‘his sword’ i.e. belonging to the subject. Compare this with ‘Eius collum’ which means ‘his neck’, or ‘its neck’, meaning the monster’s; if Perseus had wounded ‘collum suum’ that would mean he had wounded his own neck.
sustulit. -  Notice that the perfect forms of ‘tollo’ are the same as those of ‘suffero (sub + fero)’, 'endure.'
desuper - from above
impetum fecit – ‘he charged’; ‘he made an attack’, from impetum facere.
Gladio suo - with his sword, the ablative case here is ablative of the instrument.
Edidit – ‘emitted, gave forth, let out’.
Reditum eius – ‘its return’, i.e. the monster’s return (see suum, eius above).
neque - here translated 'and ... not.' Neque is often used for ‘et non’.

c) Note: This section is not translated into idiomatic English but is intended, together with the notes, to give you the gist of the meaning; you can then come up with your own improved translation.


At Perseus ubi haec vídit, gladium suum édúxit,
But Perseus when he saw this, drew his sword
et postquam tálária induit, in áera sublátus est.
and after he put on his sandals, was carried up into the air.
Tum désuper in mónstrum impetum subitó fécit,
Then from above he suddenly charged the monster
et gladió suó collum éius graviter vulnerávit.
And with his sword seriously wounded its neck.
Mónstrum ubi sénsit vulnus, fremitum horribilem édidit,
The monster when it felt the wound, let out a horrible roar,
et sine morá tótum corpus in aquam mersit.
And without delay sunk its whole body into the water.
Perseus dum circum lítus volat, reditum éius exspectábat.
Perseus while he is flying around the shore was awaited its return.
Mare autem intereá undique sanguine ínficitur.
And the sea in the meantime is turning to blood in all directions.
Post breve tempus bélua rúrsus caput sustulit;
After a short time the sea monster again raised its head
mox tamen á Perseó íctú gravióre vulneráta est.
but soon by a blow from Perseus it was seriously wounded.
Tum iterum sé in undás mersit,
Then again it plunged itself into the waves,
neque posteá vísa est.
and afterwards was not it seen again.

d)This section is for you to copy and compose your own translation.
At Perseus ubi haec vidit, gladium suum eduxit,
et postquam talaria induit, in aera sublatus est.
Tum desuper in monstrum impetum subito fecit,
et gladio suo collum eius graviter vulneravit.
Monstrum ubi sensit vulnus,
fremitum horribilem edidit,
et sine mora totum corpus in aquam mersit.
Perseus dum circum litus volat,
reditum eius exspectabat.
Mare autem interea undique sanguine inficitur.
Post breve tempus belua rursus caput sustulit;
mox tamen a Perseo ictu graviore vulnerata est.
Tum iterum se in undas mersit, neque postea visa est.

1 comment:

Jude Fawley said...

Not sure how populated this blog is--but suggesting an edit to the translation anyway. graviore modifies ictu as an adjective, it is not an adverb--so the translation should read 'wounded by a more serious blow from Perseus'.